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workshop with Mark Steinmetz: Deepening Your Practice

When:
19 November 2016 @ 10:00 – 20 November 2016 @ 18:00
2016-11-19T10:00:00+01:00
2016-11-20T18:00:00+01:00
Where:
Micamera - lens based arts
Via Medardo Rosso
19, 20159 Milano
Italia

This post is also available in: Ita

Workshop with MARK STEINMETZ
DEEPENING YOUR PRACTICE
November 19 + 20, 2016 – Micamera, Milan

mark_steinmetz_005

Deepening Your Practice is a two-day workshop in a small group with Mark Steinmetz and is open to anyone and all kinds of work.
It aims at helping participants understanding better the meaning and the purpose of their work and finding ways to bring clarity to their direction and intent. The workshop will include a lesson on the author’s work and influences: the American tradition and the French tradition, as well as contemporary photography from around the world.  This will help students to connect more deeply to their own practice and to consider their work within a more expanded context

MARK STEINMETZ is a photographer who resides in Athens, Georgia (USA). He has nine books published by the Nazraeli Press (Paso Robles, CA): South Central, South East, Greater Atlanta, Summertime, Italia, The Ancient Tigers of my Neighborhood, Paris in my time, The Players and Angel City West. A book with Stanley/Barker (London), 15 Miles to K-ville, will be published in late 2016.

Steinmetz’s work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and others. He has taught photography at Harvard University, Yale University, Sarah Lawrence College, Emory University, and The University of Hartford MFA Program. Steinmetz is a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship and has exhibited widely in the United States and Europe.

In early 2015, he had a one-person show at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
At Micamera Mark Steinmetz will exhibit a selection from his early LA work, published in the book Angel City West (Nazraeli Press, 2015)

THE WORKSHOP:
when: Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th November, 10am-6pm
where: Micamera, Milan – via Medardo Rosso, 19
how many people: maximum 13
language: English
how much: 330€ (remember! Join our Masterclass and choose three workshops within a year at a reduced price) / 280€ for Micamera associates
early bird (by the end of October) or under 20: 300€/250€ for Micamera associates
info: Giulia Zorzi / associazione@micamera.it / giulia@micamera.com / 335 6817 917

schermata-2016-10-11-alle-06-19-21

Mark Steinmetz’ contribution to: The Photographer’s Playbook, 307 Assignments and Ideas
Edited by Jason Fulford and Gregory Halpern
 – published by Aperture in June 2014

Assignment: Photograph somewhere you are very uncomfortable

There are all kinds of successful photographic approaches where the photographer is quite comfortable when taking his or her pictures. I don’t think André Kértesz, for example, ever felt uncomfortable when taking a photograph. Someone like Brassaï, however, had a bodyguard with him at various times. So much of good photography happens when one begins to overcome one’s personal limitations. Students tend to be very shy, particularly when photographing people they don’t know. They often retreat to photograph in empty, abandoned places where no one will bother them.

To do photography for the most part one must maneuver one’s body around to actually be in the right spot to take a picture. The photographer must be physically in front of something. So often it seems that students are not getting themselves in front of the things that really interest them because they aren’t quite brave enough. I try to remind them that passion can’t really exist in the absence of risk, the feeling of risk. Over the years a few of my students have gone to dangerous neighborhoods and clubs, to slaughterhouses, or visited their estranged parents, but most of them never really address this assignment directly or fully — many find clever ways to avoid it. But perhaps this assignment gives them something to think about.